Welcome West IPA

sludge

Well after a little bit of a break from brewing I was back at it today. I’m not too much of a hophead, but I wanted to make a west coast style IPA to help work through some hops that needed to get used up and for Yama’s brother and fiance who will be moving to the great PNW in a few weeks. And nothing says “Welcome to Portland” quite like a freshly brewed batch of hoppy homebrew. I ended getting a slightly higher than expected efficiency so this might turn out to be a true west coast IPA. Here’s the recipe:

OG: 1.066
FG: 1.012
ABV: 7.0%
Mash: 151

Added: 8.8g Gypsum, 1.6g CaCl & 1.1g Baking Soda to Mash & 8.3g Gypsum & 1.5g CaCl to sparge water.

Water Profile:

Ca: 147.6
Mg: 0.6
Na: 26.4
So4: 290.5
Cl: 53.6
BiCarbonate: 57.6
Mash PH: 5.3

75.4% 2-Row
8.2% Munich Malt
4.9% Vienna Malt
4.9% Wheat Malt
3.3% C15
3.3% Dextrose (added to boil)

0.35 oz Galena (11%) 60 min.
1.00 oz Cascade (5.5%) 15 min.
1.25 oz Centennial (10.9%) 10 min.
1.75 oz Simcoe (12.2%) 5 min.
1.75 oz Citra (14.4%) 5 min.
1.00 oz Chinook (11%) 2 min.
1.25 oz Simcoe (12.2%) 0 min.
2.25 oz Citra (14.4%) 0 min.
2.00 oz Amarillo (8.5%) 0 min.
1.25 oz Centennial (10.9%) 0 min.
1.00 oz Amarillo (Dry Hop)
1.00 oz Citra (Dry Hop)
1.00 oz Simcoe (Dry Hop)

Wyeast 1272 American Ale II Yeast
1.5l starter on stir plate for 36 hours, decanted prior to pitching.

CarboyThe last couple quarts being racked into the fermenter were super hop-sludgy. I remember why I don’t brew super hoppy beers with pellet hops too often, its always a pain to deal with at this point. Although, I tried to compensate by having a slightly more volume in the kettle than usual, this one was still slow going at the end. After the carboy was full it looked like a 1/3rd of it was full of hops!

gravity

After fermentation was active I brought the temperature down to about 62 and let ferment from there in the basement which is about 63 degrees right now. The beer has been free rising slowly and is about 65 on day two. The co2 coming out of the fermenter smells super hoppy (which is a nice change from those german beers)! I’m excited to try this one in a month or so.

5.8.13 – Added Dry Hops
5.16.13 (am) – Cold Crash
5.17.13 – Kegged. Gravity sample has a great nose with citrus fruits being the most prominent. Very good aroma. Sample tasted really smooth and hoppy, with just a moderately low amount of bitterness. I think this one is going to smooth out nicely and be really enjoyable.

6.4.13

A: Pours a nice caramel orange color with a finger of white head that recedes after a few minutes. Clarity is slightly hazy.
S: Huge aromas of passion fruit and mangoes with some grapefruit detectable as well. Really fresh and floral.
T: Tropical fruit hop flavors are the first to greet the palate with other notes of orange, grapefruit and pine coming in next. Just a hint of bitterness with all the hop flavors being clean. A little toasty malt flavors are there in the background but definitely take a back seat to the hops. Drinks really smooth, especially considering the gravity.
M: Medium low mouthfeel with a little bit of a slickness (probably from the hop oils as diacetyl is non-existent in this beer).
O: I really like this IPA. I don’t brew them often, but this one has really great hop flavors and a huge hoppy aroma but still drinks smooth and easy. There is just enough bitterness to hang on the tongue but never does it seem like its a bitter beer. The malt bill does a good job of standing up to the hops and has some toasty and bready notes present. Not a beer I could drink pint after pint, but a perfect hoppy beer for the warm months ahead.

IMAG0105

 

I gave my dad a bottle of IPA to take home the other week and he did a side by side against Boneyard’s RPM IPA. Boneyard’s is on the left, but appearance wise they are pretty similar beers. He noticed subtle differences but both beers were not all that dissimilar.

Advertisements

One thought on “Welcome West IPA

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s